Begun in 2017, this series ("Fractures") is based on photographs and stills from video of people from the web and other sources that resonate with me on an emotional level and reveal something human and universal.  The works address issues of identity, cultural context/appropriation, and pose questions such as: What is shown?  What is hidden?  The real subject is the original image as filtered through various media. In the case of my painting based on the iconic photo of Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce (posed in formal dress below), what was photographer Edward S. Curtis's point of view? What is the truth behind the image?

These works contrast representational fields of light brushwork with abstract fields of heavy paint applied with putty knives, and play with the rhythmic interaction of field and ground, separation/blending, and color opposites.  Often the canvas is"fractured" itself, strengthening the third dimension.  Process involves an intentional design concept that incorporates, in the execution, the mystery and surprise of paint allowed to express itself spontaneously on the canvas.

Below, is a work from another photo by Curtis of a mother and child, two works based on stills from the experimental film "Kiss" by Andy Warhol, and a photo of a young mother from 1946.  The last work shown is actually the first piece painted in this series, "Shelly", whose image inspired this direction in my journey as a painter.